Toxicants Involved in Thyroid Dysfunction









Environmental factors play an important role in causation of autoimmune thyroid diseases.

Genetics contributes to 70% of the risk.

Knowledge of various factors influencing thyroid dysfunction can help in interpreting the results of such studies in a better way. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk due to positive family history.

Pesticides:

Organochlorine compounds found in pesticides, induce hepatic enzymes leading to decreased half-life of serum thyroxine (T4).

Isoflavones: Is flavones are produced almost exclusively by the members of the bean family,

Chemicals in cosmetics:

A study on Benzophenone-2 treated rats showed low T4 levels and high TSH levels besides altered Thyroid-peroxidase activity. Benzophenone prevents ultraviolet (UV) light from damaging scents and colors in products such as perfumes and soaps.

Another chemical OMC (Octyl-methoxycinnamate)causes dose dependent decrease in serum T3 and T4 concentration in rats. It is an active ingredient in OTC sunscreen products

Heavy Metals:

Heavy metals like cadmium and lead are known to affect thyroid function.

Other toxins :

They have been found in air, water, soil, and sediments throughout the world. Fabaceae. It reduces thyroperoxidase activity, and hence lower Thyroid functions. Polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominateddiphenylethers, bisphenol-A, and triclosan may have direct action on thyroid hormone receptor. Consumers higher on the food chain such as humans and other carnivores are exposed to higher concentrations than those at the bottom, which only eat vegetation. Human exposure also begins prenatally as many POPs can cross the placenta. After birth exposure occurs through breast milk and also through inhalation, ingestion, and skin contact . They have been found in air, water, soil, and sediments throughout the world. So, save your planet.

References:

1. Pearce EN, Braverman LE. Environmental pollutants and the thyroid. Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009;23(6):801–13.

2. Bahn AK, Mills JL, Synder PJ, Gann PH, Houten L, Bialik O, et al. Hypothyroidism in workers exposed to polybrominated biphenyls. NEngl J Med. 1980;302:31–33.

Environmental factors play an important role in causation of autoimmune thyroid diseases.

Genetics contributes to 70% of the risk.

Knowledge of various factors influencing thyroid dysfunction can help in interpreting the results of such studies in a better way. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk due to positive family history.

Pesticides:

Organochlorine compounds found in pesticides, induce hepatic enzymes leading to decreased half-life of serum thyroxine (T4).

Isoflavones: Is flavones are produced almost exclusively by the members of the bean family,

Chemicals in cosmetics:

A study on Benzophenone-2 treated rats showed low T4 levels and high TSH levels besides altered Thyroid-peroxidase activity. Benzophenone prevents ultraviolet (UV) light from damaging scents and colors in products such as perfumes and soaps.

Another chemical OMC (Octyl-methoxycinnamate)causes dose dependent decrease in serum T3 and T4 concentration in rats. It is an active ingredient in OTC sunscreen products

Heavy Metals:

Heavy metals like cadmium and lead are known to affect thyroid function.

Other toxins :

They have been found in air, water, soil, and sediments throughout the world. Fabaceae. It reduces thyroperoxidase activity, and hence lower Thyroid functions. Polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominateddiphenylethers, bisphenol-A, and triclosan may have direct action on thyroid hormone receptor. Consumers higher on the food chain such as humans and other carnivores are exposed to higher concentrations than those at the bottom, which only eat vegetation. Human exposure also begins prenatally as many POPs can cross the placenta. After birth exposure occurs through breast milk and also through inhalation, ingestion, and skin contact . They have been found in air, water, soil, and sediments throughout the world. So, save your planet.

References:

1. Pearce EN, Braverman LE. Environmental pollutants and the thyroid. Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009;23(6):801–13.

2. Bahn AK, Mills JL, Synder PJ, Gann PH, Houten L, Bialik O, et al. Hypothyroidism in workers exposed to polybrominated biphenyls. NEngl J Med. 1980;302:31–33.


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